insecure writers support group, new release

IWSG: New Releases by Nicki Elson and Chrys Fey

Welcome to the August 2020 edition of the Insecure Writers Support Group, hosted by Alex Cavanaugh.

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Congratulations to my critique partner, Nicki Elson, on the launch of her 8th novel yesterday: MOLLY UNPLANNED.

Here’s my 5-star review of Miss Molly.

I’m thrilled to co-host today, along with: Susan Baury Rouchard, Nancy Gideon, Jennifer Hawes, Chemist Ken, and Chrys Fey!

Speaking of the lovely Chrys Fey, I’m part of the blog hop to celebrate her new release, Keep Writing with Fey: Sparks to Defeat Writer’s Block, Depression, and Burnout. Congratulations to Chrys! Scroll down to read my own experience with these issues.

KWWF

Catch the sparks you need to conquer writer’s block, depression, and burnout!

When Chrys Fey shared her story about depression and burnout, it struck a chord with other writers. That put into perspective for her how desperate writers are to hear they aren’t alone. Many creative types experience these challenges, battling to recover. Let Keep Writing with Fey: Sparks to Defeat Writer’s Block, Depression, and Burnout guide you through:

  • Writer’s block
  • Depression
  • Writer’s burnout
  • What a writer doesn’t need to succeed
  • Finding creativity boosts

With these sparks, you can begin your journey of rediscovering your creativity and get back to what you love – writing.

(The table of contents of this book looks fantastic!)

BOOK LINKS:

Amazon / Nook / iTunes / Kobo

Goodreads

Chrys Fey Author Photo

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Chrys Fey is the author of Write with Fey: 10 Sparks to Guide You from Idea to Publication. She is also the author of the Disaster Crimes series. Visit her blog, Write with Fey, for more tips on how to reverse writer’s burnout. https://www.chrysfey.com/

Keep Writing with Fey Blog Hop: Share your story about writer’s block, depression, and/or burnout and how you overcame it or what you are currently doing to heal.

Since writing is secondary to my work as a psychologist, I write only when I feel like it. Therefore, I don’t experience much writer’s block or burnout. But I have turned to writing to deal with feelings of depression from painful events in my psychology career.

For 15 years, I have worked for two different university departments, and I don’t seem to fit well with one of them. Twice, that department has chosen to work with another psychologist instead of me. (I guess I’m a masochist for returning after the first time they let me go.) The process has been all the more agonizing due to their lack of direct communication. It was a gradual ghosting instead of a kind cutoff.

Therapy has taught me that self-talk is important for healing. When hurtful events happen, we can benefit from compassionate narratives. Since I write romance novels, some of my narratives compared getting fired to romantic rejection:

When reality sucked, I turned to fiction.

They don’t know my strength.

I won’t let one person determine my value.

We separated, then reunited, but the bitterness and poor communication continued, leading to a divorce.

A relationship breakup doesn’t mean either person is wrong or bad; it’s just a poor fit. I can find a better fit elsewhere, or I can stay single by going into private practice! 😀

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What is YOUR experience with writer’s block, depression, or burnout? Thanks for stopping by.

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#IWSG Inspringration

Welcome to May’s Insecure Writer’s Support Group hosted by Alex Cavanaugh. It’s a great place to vent fears and encourage each other.


Make sure to visit May’s Co-Hosts:

May’s Question: It’s spring! Does this season inspire you to write more than others, or not?

Thank goodness spring has sprung. These cold, cloudy days have been major downers. The longer daylight in spring often motivates many aspects of my life, including writing. 

I’m also inspired by different types of artists. Is anyone watching American Idol? I’m amazed by how much I enjoy the new season. Besides writing, creative pursuits like singing, cooking (in Chopped), and fashion design (in Project Runway) enthrall me.

Here’s a post that might interest you: Seven Ways to Build Your Writing Confidence.

Happy writing!
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How to Make Your #Arguments Effective–Guest Post by Lucy Adams


How to Make Your Arguments Effective to Convince People
Welcome to Lucy Adams from BuzzEssay, here today with a guest post.

There are a lot of different books and training on how to be successful. Many aim to achieve it through thick and thin, but very few notice that all that they need is the skill of convincing. Yes, convincing and nothing more!

Knowing how to manipulate and change opinions of others, you’ll easily reach personal goals. So if you’re dreaming of becoming a master of conviction, this article is just for you!

To begin with, let’s state that the structure of persuasion consists of three key elements – thesis, arguments, and support. Use them wisely, and you’ll be able to change the position of others towards what you say and do.

#1 Thesis

A thesis is the point of view you want to convey to the audience. Try to state it briefly, clearly, and within one sentence. For example, let’s imagine you say, “Fast food is unhealthy.” Of course, that’s not enough! Explain why you think so. People usually take little for granted, except the well-known axioms that are difficult to argue.

#2 Argumentation

Argumentation is the most complicated stage of convincing, which is carried out to change the position of the interlocutor. It’s used with respect to the social context (if you’re the boss, it’s unlikely that you’ll convince your subordinate of something as you can just put him before the fact).
There are also situations when a person simply does not have enough information to change his position. And when you disclose some additional data, he changes his view. Actually, in this case, you just give information, not using any other tricks.

Argumentation can be either theoretical (based on logical reasoning) or empirical (relying on practice or experience). So how to build your proof? The rules are quite simple:

·     First of all, you should prepare in advance. Approach to the matter seriously – write down all your arguments, and then distribute them into four groups:
o   Safety (for example, a guarantee).
o  Respect (how the person will fill after taking your point of view or buying your product).
o   Independence (the positive implications).
o   Perfection (how the person can use his potential due to the change of his/her previous point of view to yours).

At first glance, these concepts are quite abstract and in some cases even stretched, but they are actively and quite successfully used in sales when you need to convince a potential customer to buy some product or service.

·    Once you divide all your arguments into the four groups, check whether they give comprehensive answers to the following questions:
o   What problems does your statement/thesis solve?
o   Is it convenient for the opponent to take your point of view? Will it be worth much to the interlocutor?
o   Have you provided the interlocutor with enough information so that he/she can safely take your position?



If you have clear answers to all these questions while the arguments are backed up and related to safety, respect, independenceand perfection, most likely, you’ll be able to persuade the other person.

Now let’s get back to the example. You should explain the thesis using several arguments, ideally three. These may be:

·      Substandard products are used for cooking.
·      Fast food contains many preservatives.
·      Fast food contains harmful flavor enhancers.

#3 Support

Any argument becomes much more significant if you prove it. For this purpose, you can use statistics, personal experience, reviews, references to authoritative sources, documents and so on. For example:
·      After I had lunch at a fast food restaurant, I had a stomach ache.
·      The doctor said that consuming a lot of cheeseburgers leads to gastritis.
·      According to “XXX” documentary, fast food restaurant use poor-quality raw materials.


The main requirement at this stage is that the provided information must be truthful and not contrary to the arguments.

Some oratory masters believe that the three stages of conviction should strictly follow each other, some say that this sequence is not important. Also, there is the following technique:

·      Thesis->Argument no.1 + Support no.1, Argument no.2 + Support no.2, Argument no.3 + Support no.3, summary concerning the thesis in the beginning.



Well, the most important is that all these strategies work! The main point is that you should rely on your personal experience and context of the particular situation when choosing between them.   

Bio:

Lucy Adams is a blogger from BuzzEssay – a website that provides research paper writing and many other writing services. She’s an aspiring author who never refuses to cover intriguing themes, regardless of their origin. Education, literature, business, psychology – whatever – if you have something exciting to suggest, Lucy will bring it to life! Contact this diligent author at lucyadams@buzzessay.com

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#IWSG Pinterinspiration #Pinterest #Writing #Inspiration

Happy May, writers. Time to discuss our hopes and fears. Join us at Alex Cavanaugh’s blog. The amazing co-hosts for the May 4 posting of the IWSG will be Stephen Tremp, Fundy Blue, MJ Fifield, Loni Townsend, Bish Denham, Susan Gourley, and Stephanie Faris!


We writers find inspiration in the strangest places. For me, Pinterest is top on my list. I’m addicted to Pinterest, I must admit.

I like to create a Pinterest board when writing to collect images and websites that relate to the story.

For my work in progress SPIKED (Blocked #3), I’ve pinned these images:

1) Volleyball T-shirts (the heroine from Blocked has quite a collection)




2) Bad pickup lines (How Mateo gets Jessica to laugh)




What inspires YOUR writing? What’s the worst pickup line you’ve heard?

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Learning Cool Stuff Through Writing #IWSG


Woo hoo, I love summer. Time for June’s Insecure Writers Support Group, hosted by Alex Cavanaugh

Alex’s awesome co-hosts for the June 3 posting of the IWSG are M. Pax, Tracy Jo,Patricia Lynne, Rachna Chhabria, Feather Stone, and Randi Lee!

Writers, join us HERE


There are so many cool aspects about writing, but one of my favorites is learning something new.

I just wrote a chapter in my work-in-progress Aced where the hero attends confession with a priest. I like to write moments when my characters grow and challenge dysfunctional behaviors. Typically this involves throwing my characters into therapy. But Aced’s hero Alejandro is a Catholic Latino good boy, and I wanted to try a new space for healing and development outside the therapy office.

Although I attended Notre Dame for grad school, I’m not Catholic, and I’ve never experienced confession myself. Luckily, my critique partner is Catholic, and she provided a helpful link explaining the process. I also found this list of sins that blew me away. Jeez… I sin all the time!

Did you know that pirating ebooks is a sin? 😮

Both confession and therapy involve reflection and sharing secrets. But one unique part of confession is FORGIVENESS. I love the idea of seeking God’s mercy in an effort to forgive ourselves.

What cool stuff have you learned through writing?

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#IWSG: Tighten Your Writing


Time for 2015’s first Insecure Writer’s Support Group, a chance to share our hopes and fears, hosted by Alex Cavanaugh.


Since starting as a writer eight years ago, I’ve grown. (I’ve gained about twenty pounds, but that’s for another post.) The kind of growth I’ll discuss today is writing skill development. While I still have so much to learn, one area I’ve improved is tighter writing.

Be gone, verbal diarrhea!

So I want to share this excellent post, 25 Ways to Tighten Your Writing by Betsy Mikel with YOU.

A few of those tips that resonate with me:

1) Stop the adverb abuse. (I was a big offender). Dump the adverbs and choose more descriptive verbs. Instead of “I moved slowly”, try “I trudged.”

2) Knock out the highfalutin’ vocabulary. When I first started writing, I wanted to impress everyone with my intelligence by using words like avocation, prescient, and anathema. Then I learned NOBODY CARES how smart I am. Readers just want a good story with compelling characters, and bigass words might interrupt the flow.

3) Use contractions, which help dialogue sound more realistic. I can’t believe how long I’d write without contractions.

The article provides a link to 200 Common Redundancies. My critique partner Nicki Elson and I felt overwhelmed by reading that list!

In 2015, may your writing be loose and your editing tight, writer friends.

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#IWSG: To Series or Not To Series


Thanks to author ninja Alex Cavanaugh for his brainchild:


I want to hear your experiences with writing series. Love ’em? Hate ’em?

I have written one stand-alone New Adult sports romance and one romantic suspense trilogy. I’m considering turning my upcoming NA volleyball romance Blocked into a series.

So I have some writerly questions for you, in my deliberations. Feel free to answer none, one, or more!

1. Do you prefer to read stand-alone novels or series? Why?

2. Have you ever written a series (or plan to write one)? If so, when in the process did you realize you wanted to write a series?

3. If you like series, do you prefer the same characters as protagonists or new main characters featuring “spin-offs” in subsequent novels?

4. How do you decide to write a stand-alone or a series?

5. How many books are ideal for a series? When does a series get too long for you?

THANK YOU! Write on, my friends.

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Authors Promoting Authors

A big thank you to Alex Cavanaugh for starting the…
Insecure Writers Support Group.

Today I’ll share an idea to make yucky marketing more fun:

Create a MARKETING TEAM with fellow authors!

Do you feel uncomfortable tooting your own horn? Do you lack the time to keep your books in the public eye? My pub sisters at Omnific Publishing decided to overcome those problems by designating one author a week for some major book pimpage.

How does it work? The designated author creates some marketing materials and shares them with our closed Facebook group. Then other authors in the group promote that author throughout the week.  Here are the various marketing strategies:

1) Tweets. The author creates tweets like:

Friendship is the best kind of ship. #NA #Navy #swimming #romance STREAMLINE by @JenLaneBooks http://amzn.to/1928OMJ #HotMenInUniform
…and her fellow authors tweet like crazy.
2) Goodreads. We “like” the 4 star and 5 star reviews for the designated author’s books, thereby bumping those reviews to the top.
3) Facebook and Pinterest.
My amazingly talented pub sister Carol Oates volunteered to create images with quotes from our books on them. I can’t wait for my week to unveil images like these:


What creative marketing strategies have YOU tried?